News

Water – Bottled or Tap – How do you take it?

April 17, 2013
Linda Mathieson

Bottled or Tap? This is a question we should all be asking ourselves and with so much available information on the subject there should be only one answer – TAP.

Why you ask?  Well there are three very good reasons:

  • your health
  • the environment
  • and, your pockets with over half a billion dollars spent each year on bottled water.

In NSW and QLD a batch of Cool Ridge water bottles was recalled by Schweppes in 2011 after consumers complained there was a strong chlorine smell coming from their bottled water. Equipment at the bottling plant is cleaned out using chlorine and then fresh water is run through the equipment, it is likely this may not have been done in this case.

Reusing plastic bottles is also detrimental to our health as they contain Bisphenol A (BPA) which has been proven to interfere with the body’s natural hormonal messaging system.

Each year only 36% of plastic water bottles are recycled resulting in millions of plastic bottles ending up in landfill or floating around our oceans ultimately killing bird and marine life when they mistake the plastic for food.

Come on people, if we really care about our health, the environment and our wallets, lets get serious about our choices and choose Tap every time!

For more information click on the links below.

The Cool Ridge recall

Bisphenol A (BPA)

The real cost of bottled water

What is the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch?

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying plastic water bottles or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

8 Reasons to Ban the Plastic Water Bottle

March 27, 2013
Linda Mathieson

  1. Millions of plastic water bottles are thrown away annually in Australia alone, only 36% of those are recycled
  2. It can take up to 1000 years for a plastic bottle to breakdown which means millions of  plastic bottles pollute our environment every year either ending up in landfill or floating around our oceans
  3. Plastic bottles contain Bisphenol (BPA) which has been proven to be harmful to humans as it interferes with the body’s natural hormonal messaging system
  4. It can take 3 litres of water to produce a 1 litre plastic bottle of water and Australia’s usage of bottled water generates 60,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually
  5. 80% of the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch is made up of debris from land such as plastic bottles and bags
  6. Plastic waste is killing our bird and marine life who mistake it for food
  7. Australians spend more than half a billion dollars each year on bottled water
  8. In Australia Tap Water is a safe drinking choice as municipal water managers are required to regularly test tap water

Sources: Clean Up Australia, Go Tap

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying plastic water bottles or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Could this mean the end of the line for the plastic water bottle?

March 4, 2013
The Sydney Morning Herald, Environment
David Sygall

It’s a battle over billions, but both sides agree plastic bottle sales are falling

Bottled water producers are facing increasing pressure as the product falls from favour among the industry’s most loyal buyers.

Figures provided to Fairfax by Roy Morgan Research show that in the 12 months to September last year 30 per cent of 25- to 34-year-olds said they drank bottled water, compared with 36 per cent in 2007. In the 14 to 25 age group, 33 per cent drank bottled water compared with 35 per cent in 2007.

The industry’s opponents believe the numbers show a tipping point has been reached, and bottled water sales will fall as people learn more about a product that is, according to Clean Up Australia chief Ian Kiernan, ”a bloody disgrace”.

The Australasian Bottled Water Institute claims volume growth is expected to be between 7 and 8 per cent this year, but concedes there has been a marked drop in the number of young people buying the product.

”We think it’s due to a number of reasons,” says the institute’s chief executive, Geoff Parker. ”Maturity of the category is part of it, the anti-bottled water detractors are good in their messaging, and other categories within health and wellness, such as iced teas, are doing very well.”

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying plastic water bottles or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Sugary drinks to be phased out in ACT Schools

February 21, 2013

aquafil water refill stations are now been installed in public schools across ACT.

Hawker College, Alfred Deakin High School, Campbell High School, Namadgi School and Ngunnawal Primary School students will all receive re-useable water bottles in an effort to encourage them to use the aquafil water refill stations to fill up in a joint initiative by the ACT Education and Training and Health Directorates.

ACT Government Press Release …

August 27, 2012
ACT News

Soft drinks, fruit juice and flavoured milk will be phased out of ACT primary  schools within five years if they ACT Government is re-elected in October.

Chief Minister Katy Gallagher has announced a $500,000 fund to install water  bottle refill stations and supply reusable bottles to government and  non-government primary schools, high schools and colleges.

Schools that apply for one of the machines will have to agree to phase out  the sale of sugary drinks from canteens and vending machines.

Ms Gallagher said the aim was to tackle rising obesity rates among children  by phasing out the sale of all sugary drinks in Canberra primary schools by  2017.

“We already know that in the last four years we’ve seen increases in  childhood obesity rates and in children who are overweight,” she said.

“One of the causes of that, without any doubt, is access to sugary drinks and  consumption of sugary drinks.

“We need to make water the drink of choice again for children.”

Read more from Canberra Times…

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying bottled water or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Water filling station in Milton, Shoalhaven

February 17, 2013
Ulladula Info

The water filling station is located on the eastern side of the Princes Highway near the pedestrian crossing.

This is the first of its kind to be installed in the Shoalhaven.

It incorporates both a water drinking fountain or ( “bubbler”), and access points to fill re-usable bottles. The filling stations are a much cheaper and environmentally responsible option for free drinking water to the public.

The installation of water filling stations particularly in popular community areas is a great opportunity to promote the benefits of drinking tap water.

Shoalhaven’s tap water is clean, natural and healthy and we want to be able to contribute to a city that is committed to reducing its carbon footprint.

Read more from Ulladulla.info…

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying bottled water or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Tap water sold as bottled water gets 180,000 per cent mark-up

February 14, 2013

Why buy bottled water when you can reduce plastic waste and refill your reusable bottle at one of the many aquafil water bottle refill stations that are being installed around Australia?

According to this Sunday Telegraph article, many manufacturers of bottled water admit to filling their bottles from the Sydney Water mains.

August 26,2012
Laura Speranza
The Sunday Telegraph

TAKE a closer look at your bottle of “pure” water: it’s probably sourced from the tap. Millions of unsuspecting customers are buying filtered tap water and boiled rainwater at massive mark-ups of more than 180,000 per cent.

Several manufacturers admit they fill their bottles from the Sydney Water mains after applying filtration and purification procedures – but they insist customers know their water is not sourced from a mineral spring, and are happy to pay for the convenience of having it in a plastic bottle.

The major brands that describe themselves as “spring” or “mineral” water are genuine natural spring water, including Mount Franklin, Fiji Water, Pump and the Coles and Woolworths homebrands.

But supermarket and convenience stores stock brands that describe themselves as “purified” or “organic” and are in fact the same water available in every home for less than one cent a litre.

Filtered tap water – brands such as Aqua Pura, Mizone, Noble’s Pureau, Nature’s Best Organic, Active Organic and Refresh – are sold in Coles, Woolworths, Franklins and IGA as well as petrol stations and convenience stores.

Read more from news.com.au…

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying bottled water or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Australian study shows sugary soft drink link with tooth decay

January 31, 2013
Allison Van Beers
AFN
THOUGHT FOR FOOD

Australian research, published online this month and to be published soon in the American Journal of Public Health,  has shown that the “consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) should be considered a major risk factor” for dental problems such as tooth decay and cavities.

According to the study, “caries [otherwise known as tooth decay disease or a cavity] was significantly associated with greater SSB consumption”.

Undertaken by the Australian Research Centre for Population Oral Health (ARCPOH), which operates out of the University of Adelaide, the four year study involved 16, 508 children, aged 5 to 16 years old.

“Children who brushed their teeth less often and were older, male, of low Social Economic Status, from rural or remote areas consumed significant more SSBs”, notes the study.

Read more from the AFN…

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying bottled water or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Australians urged to rethink sugary drinks

HEALTH organisations are trying to take the fizz out of Australians’ love of soft drinks.

January 17, 2013
The Australian

Along with the launch of a new TV campaign to warn of the dangers of sugary beverages, they’ve also proposed a tax on drinks with high sugar levels.

The campaign, Rethink Sugary Drink, which launches today, will encourage Australians to give up the soft drink habit and switch to water and reduced-fat milk.

The TV ad, borrowed from a similar New York campaign, is part of a call to action by the Cancer Council, Diabetes Australia and the National Heart Foundation to stem obesity rates.

They have called for a government tax on sugary drinks and asked schools and non-government organisations to limit their sale and availability.

Cancer Council Australia public health committee chair Craig Sinclair said a regular 600ml soft drink contains about 16 packs of sugar.

Read more from The Australian

aquafil Water Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains

Water is essential for healthy living and is crucial for sporting, mental and academic performances. Tap water represents value for money as it’s cheaper for the community than buying bottled water or other soft drinks.

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

Lord Howe Island Installs aquafil Refill Stations

January 14, 2013

aquafil refill stations helping save marine life

The ocean and coastline are home to a vast array of marine life. Life that is being threatened by the amount of plastic waste floating around the oceans. One way to reduce this waste is to reduce the sale of the single use water bottle. The aquafil range of water bottle refill stations and drinking fountains serve as a dynamic  educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources.

Lord Howe Island is a taking an active role in reducing the amount of plastic used on the island by charging a fee for plastic bags, promoting the use of Keg beer and installing aquafil water refill stations.

Lord Howe Travellers recently sponsored the installation of an aquafil water refill station at Lord Howe Island Airport. The Lord Howe Island Board assisted with free installation and two more aqua water refill stations are planned for major tourist spots on the Island.

The aquafil refill stations are to encourage people to use refillable water bottles and help protect seabirds and marine life affected by plastic pollution.

Not only is plastic waste an eyesore for tourists and beach goers, it also poses a serious risk to the seabirds and marine animals who are becoming sick and dying from ingesting plastic.

But it is not only residents and tourists causing this problem, it is people thousands of miles away who consume and dispose of plastic without realising the implications of their actions.

Read more about what is being done to reduce the the amount of plastic washing up on Lord Howe’s beaches…

US town bans bottled water

January, 3 2013
Hugh Radojev
TNT AU Magazine

A law passed in the town of Concord in the state of Massachusetts has made the serving of water in single-serve plastic bottles illegal.

This law which went into effect in the town over the New Year is aimed at targeting pollution from the dumping of plastic bottles in waterways and streams.

The ban is intended to encourage the use of tap water and as a result does not stretch to any other liquid that may be found in a plastic bottle such as Coke or Pepsi.

Indeed it says in writing that the law only, “applies to non-sparkling, unflavored drinking water.”

Jean Hill, an 84-year old activist devised the ban as a way of combating the rising number of plastic bottles being dumped in landfills.

Read more from TNT…

aquafil Water Refill Stations

The aquafil range of Water Bottle Refill Stations and Drinking Fountains serve as a dynamic educational tool in the fight to reduce plastic waste and conserve precious resources. Full colour graphics are available on most of the aquafil range and are a valuable educational tool in helping promote a sustainable way of living and encouraging a healthy lifestyle.

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